Advanced Ratings

Once you have earned a private license, you can work toward other certificates: 

Instrument Pilot 
This is usually the next step in a pilot's training.

The pilot learns to control and navigate the aircraft solely through the aircraft's instruments, flying "under the hood" or in actual Instrument Meteorological Conditions. An instrument rating allows the pilot to fly when ceilings and visibility are below VFR minimum requirements.

Training consists of advanced study of aviation weather, human physiology, aircraft systems, and the Air Traffic Control system. Students learn to communicate, navigate, and aviate in the IFR environment.

Like the Private Pilot, Instrument students must pass an FAA written test, as well as a "practical" flying test (checkride) given by an FAA examiner.

Under Legacy Aviation's part 141 curriculum, instrument students must obtain 35 hours of "hood" or "actual" time with an instructor (versus 40 hours for part 61 **) to be eligible to take the practical instrument test.

It is said that an instrument-rated pilot is a safe pilot.

Commercial Pilot 

Although a commercial rating allows you to be paid for your flying, it does not mean you can automatically start charging for your flying (there are strict air charter regulations, as well as other "hidden" rules and regulations that you learn when training for this certificate. While Ag spray pilots, and pilots working into an established part 135 (air charter) business may stop after this rating, most pilots obtain their commercial rating on the way to becoming a CFI.

A commercial rating develops a pilot's flying skills.  Maneuvers such as chandelles, lazy eights, 8's on pylons, precision landings, steep spirals, as well as stalls, and others are learned. Higher performance standards are expected of commercial students. 

The commercial training course consists of advanced study of high performance and complex aircraft, as well as advanced ground study of aerodynamics, flight instruments, FAA regulations, weather, navigation, aircraft performance, airport operations and procedures, and IFR operations.

A pilot working his/her way straight through the ratings, one right after the other, would benefit most from our part 141 curriculum. However, most pilots who have obtained flight experience since receiving the Private Pilot rating would be best served by our part 61 Commercial Pilot course. **

Like the Private Pilot and Instrument Rating, Commercial students must pass an FAA written test, as well as a "practical" flying test (checkride) given by an FAA examiner.

Legacy Aviation boasts one of the most popular and inexpensive commercial/CFI training aircraft in the region - N9791B, a Cessna Cutlass 172RG.

It is said that a commercial-rated pilot is a better pilot.

Certified Flight Instructor (CFI)

Legacy Aviation provides training for the Certified Flight Instructor rating. Like the Commercial, a pilot working his/her way straight through the ratings, one right after the other, would benefit most from our part 141 curriculum. However, most pilots who have obtained flight experience since receiving the Commercial/Instrument ratings would be best served by our part 61 CFI course. **

A large part of CFI training is learning how to instruct. There are 2 separate "ground" tests: Fundamentals of Instruction (FOI), and the CFI written test. 

The oral portion of the initial CFI test can be one of the longest (time-wise) of all of the ratings. FAA examiners will put candidates through all of the paces - teaching a ground lesson, explaining aerodynamics, explaining how to look for common mistakes, etc.

The flight portion of the CFI practical test (checkride) consists basically of flying commercial maneuvers from the right seat.

A CFI may instruct Private and Commercial Students.

Many students who wish to wish to become Airline Transport Pilots (ATP's) build flight experience by instructing.

Certified Flight Instructor Instrument (CFII)

Legacy Aviation offers both part 141 and part 61 CFII instruction.** 

A CFII may instruct Private Commercial, Instrument, as well as other CFI and CFII students (after a FAA required amount of instructing experience).

FAA tests required include the written, which is mainly a review of the instrument test; and practical (checkride), which is basically an instrument checkride from the right seat.

* *     Detailed part 141 vs part part 61 flight instruction comparisons are available at Legacy Aviation upon request.