Learn to Fly!


Take off on one of the greatest adventures of a lifetime - learn to fly. You'll extend your horizons, find new challenges and add a whole lot of fun to your life. And you'll travel farther, higher and faster than you ever have.


As a private pilot, your airplane can take you anywhere you please. Fly friends to the beach. Fly your kids to the mountains. Fly your spouse to a different city every weekend for dinner. Now that's freedom.
 
You can start at any age, although you must be 16 to solo and 17 to get a pilot certificate. After that, you can progress to an instrument rating. If you're truly ambitious, you can seek a career in aviation with a commercial certificate, an air transport pilot certificate or a flight instructor's certificate.


So take the next step and find out how you can earn your wings at Legacy Aviation!!!


Private Pilot 


No matter what your ultimate goal in aviation is - be it recreational flying or a more advanced training program - you must start by getting a private pilot's license.(Word to the wise: technically, pilots hold "certificates," not licenses, to fly, although hardly anyone except the FAA calls them that.) This private license allows a pilot to fly a single-engine airplane under visual flight rules (VFR), meaning visibility of at least three miles, as well a sat night. A private pilot may carry passengers but may not be paid for doing so, although the pilot can share operating expenses with the passengers.


The prerequisites for a pilot's license are simple enough that almost anyone can earn one:

  

 Birth certificate or passport. You must provide Legacy written documentation that you are a U.S. citizen. Non-residents will need to meet FAA requirements (see Legacy personnel for details).


 Medical examination. You must pass the basic medical exam that all applicants are required to undergo, certifying that you meet the medical standards for safely operating an aircraft. You may begin flight instruction without a medical exam. In order to solo, however,  you must have your medical certificate, which also doubles as your student pilot certificate.


 Language. All applicants for the private license have to be able to read, speak, and understand English (the international language of aviation).


 Age. The FAA says you must be at least 16 years old to fly solo with a student pilot certificate, and 17 years old to get a pilot's license.There is no upper age limit, provided that you are healthy enough to pass the basic medical exam discussed above.


 Time. A private license requires a minimum of 35 hours* off light time with most student pilots logging closer to 40-55 hours before the final check ride, as well as extra time for study on the ground in preparation for an FAA written test. The length of your training depends in part on whether you want to study full- or part-time. Intensive full-time programs can be completed in as few as two weeks or a month, while a part-time student typically takes between four and six months of flying 1-3 times a week.


 Money. While flying is certainly not restricted to the fabulously wealthy-you can learn to fly on a budget - it nevertheless is not an inexpensive endeavor. If you train part-time at a local airport, for example,plan on investing in the range of $7,000 to $10,000, with costs varying widely by region. It is a good idea to consider whether you have the funds to start toward and reach your goal within a reasonable time period. Keep in mind that you do not need to pay for all of your flight training up front. Most training programs let you pay as you go, although you might get a price break by paying for a block of lessons in advance.required to undergo, certifying that you meet the medical standards for safely operating an aircraft. You may begin flight instruction without a medical exam. In order to solo, however,  you must have your medical certificate, which also doubles as your student pilot certificate.

 Language. All applicants for the private license have to be able to read, speak, and understand English (the international language of aviation).

* Legacy Aviation is a FAA approved part 141flight school - 1 of only 2 in the state of South Dakota! Independent flight instruction offered at most other locations is FAA part 61, which requires a minimum of 40 hours of flight time. A part 141 school offers a set curriculum with stage checks from different Instructors to check not only student progress, but also the type and quality of instruction being given, as well. 141 schools and aircraft are held to the highest FAA safety standards and requirements.

 

Flight training consists of ground, as well as actual flight time in training aircraft. Legacy uses the Cessna on-line ground school course, in which the student does the majority of aviation study individually on a self-paced basis.A Legacy Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) monitors the Cessna course, but doesn't cover all of the detail of the online training. As a result, the student saves considerable expense in instruction time.

 

Other ground time includes a briefing, as well as a debriefing for every flight, and instructor time for logbook entry and endorsements.